Reports

Confidence About Financial Security at Retirement: Perspectives of African Americans and White Americans

This fall 2012 poll from the Joint Center for Political and Economic Studies finds that, although more than half of both African Americans and white Americans are ‘very or somewhat’ confident that they will be financially secure during retirement, this financial security may not become reality.

Solvency and Adequacy for the Social Security System: Perspectives of African Americans and White Americans

This 2012 poll conducted by the Joint Center for Political and Economic Studies finds that majorities of black Americans and white Americans hold the same views about proposals that would foster solvency and proposals that would improve benefit adequacy within the Social Security system. For example, to foster solvency, majorities of the two groups favor enrolling new state and local government employees in the system and oppose reducing the cost-of-living adjustment (COLA).

The Deep South and Medicaid Expansion: The View From Alabama, Georgia, Louisiana, Mississippi, and South Carolina

The Affordable Care Act (ACA) expands Medicaid so that it can provide health insurance to a larger pool of low income uninsured adults, including adults with no children and whose incomes are below about $16,000 a year. The federal government will pay the entire cost for the first three years, and after that states will pay 10 percent and the federal government 90 percent. In National Federation of Independent Business v. Sebelius, the Supreme Court ruled that states may choose whether or not to participate in the expansion.

Retirement Confidence in the Education Sector: Comparisons by Race

During the economic doldrums that have followed The Great Recession, employees in the education sector (administrators, staff, and teachers or faculty at both the K-12 level and the post-secondary level) are confident about both their retirement savings behavior and their likely retirement outcomes. African American and white American employees in the education sector are more optimistic about their retirement planning and prospects than are U.S. workers overall.

Strengthening Social Security...By Modernizing the System

Dr. Wilhelmina Leigh spoke on the whys and hows of Social Security modernization at the National Academy of Social Insurance's 25th Annual Policy Research Conference on January 31, 2013.

More presentations, videos, and other conference materials can be found on the NASI website.

Place Matters for Health in the South Delta: Ensuring Opportunities for Good Health for All

PLACE MATTERS for health in important ways, according to a growing body of research. Differences in neighborhood conditions powerfully predict who is healthy, who is sick, and who lives longer. And because of patterns of residential segregation, these differences are the fundamental causes of health inequities among different racial, ethnic, and socioeconomic groups.

Place Matters for Health in Baltimore: Ensuring Opportunities for Good Health for All

The report, “Place Matters for Health in Baltimore:  Ensuring Opportunities for Good Health for All,” finds that residents’ place of residence is an important indicator of their health and health risks.  Importantly, because of persistent racial and class segregation, place of residence is an especially important driver of the poorer health outcomes of the city’s non-white and low-income residents.

Cooling the Planet, Clearing the Air: Climate Policy, Carbon Pricing, and Co-Benefits

Policies to reduce carbon dioxide emissions can yield substantial co-benefits via reduced emissions of co-pollutants such as particulate matter, nitrogen oxides, and air toxics. Valuation studies suggest that these benefits may be comparable in magnitude to the value of reduced carbon emissions. However, co-pollutant intensity (the ratio of co-benefits to carbon dioxide emissions) varies across pollution sources, and so efficient policy design would seek greater emissions reductions where co-benefits are higher.

Place Matters: Ensuring Opportunities for Good Health for All

PLACE MATTERS for health in important ways, according to a growing body of research.  Differences in neighborhood conditions powerfully predict who is healthy, who is sick, and who lives longer.  And because of patterns of residential segregation, these differences are the fundamental causes of health inequities among different racial, ethnic, and socioeconomic groups.

Place Matters for Health in Bernalillo County: Ensuring Opportunities for Good Health for All

PLACE MATTERS for health in important ways, according to a growing body of research.  Differences in neighborhood conditions powerfully predict who is healthy, who is sick, and who lives longer.  And because of patterns of residential segregation, these differences are the fundamental causes of health inequities among different racial, ethnic, and socioeconomic groups.

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